Archive for July, 2014

Spreadsheet exercise

Posted: July 20, 2014 in Grade 11, Grade 12

For those of you who attended the Teachers Training Conference during the June holidays:

Download the memo to the Advanced Spreadsheet sessions here:  ABC CARsMEMO

I have added a comment and example about how to use the text functions Find and Length when extracting a specific part of a word with Concatenate.

 

 

 

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Gr 10 June 2014 Exam Papers

Posted: July 20, 2014 in Grade 10

 

Download grade 10 June 2014 P1 from:  http://bit.ly/1ruMDHy

(Copy link and post in browser)

 

Download grade 10 June 2014 P2 from:  http://bit.ly/1ljvNnN

(Copy link and post in browser)

What is a Blog?

A blog is a personal website that contains content organized like a journal or a diary. Each entry is dated, and the entries are displayed on the web page in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent entry is posted at the top. Readers catch up with blogs by starting at the top and reading down until they encounter material they have already read.

Though blogs are typically thought of as personal journals, there is no limit to what may be covered in a blog.

Why Use Blogs In Education

Blogs are widely popular in education, as evidenced by the 400 thousand educational blogs hosted by edublogs. Teachers have been using them to support teaching and learning since 2005. Through years of practice, a common understanding has formed around the benefits of the use of blogs in education.

Because blogs are connected, they can foster the development of a learning community. Authors can share opinions with each other and support each other with commentary and answers to questions.

Additionally, blogs give students ownership over their own learning and an authentic voice, allowing them to articulate their needs and inform their own learning. Blogs have been shown to contribute to identity-formation in students. (Bortree, D.S., 2005).

Blogs teach a variety of skills in addition to the particular subject under discussion. Regular blogging fosters the development of writing and research skills. Blogging also supports digital literacy as the student learns to critically assess and evaluate various online resources.

How To Use Blogging In Learning

Begin simply. Most uses of blogs in the classroom began with the instructor using blogs to post class information such as lists of readings and assignment deadlines. This fosters in the teacher a familiarity with the technology and with students a habit of regularly checking the online resource.

Lead by example. Before requiring students to blog, instructors should lead by example, creating their own blogs and adding links to interesting resources and commentary on class topics. This not only produces a useful source of supplemental information for students, it creates a pattern and sets expectations for when students begin their own blogging.

Read. Students should begin their entry into blogging by reading other blogs. Teachers should use this practice not only to demonstrate how other people use blogs to support learning but also to foster critical thinking and reading skills. Teaching how to respond to blog posts is as important as creating blog posts.

Create a context. Like the author facing a blank sheet of paper, a blogger will be perplexed unless given something specific to write about. Have students blog about a current issue, about a specific peice of writing, or some question that comes up in the course.

Encourage interaction. Blogging should not be a solo activity. Encourage bloggers to read each other’s works and to comment on them. Encouraging students to set up an RSS reader with each other’s blogs will make reading and commenting a lot easier. Teachers, also, should subscribe to student blogs and offer comments, again setting an example of the expected practice.

Respect ownership. A student blog becomes important because it is a manifestation of his or her own work. However, to have this value, a student’s ownership of a blog must be genuine. While reasonable limits or codes of practice need to be respected, student bloggers should have the widest latitude possible for personal expression and opinion.

Address issues immediately. The most significant danger to students online is posed by other students. In particular, bullying (or ragging) is a significant problem. It is important to spot instances of bullying as soon as they occur and to take steps to prevent further incidents. Teachers should educate themselves as online bullying can be invisible and hard to address.

From http://halfanhour.blogspot.com/2009/04/blogs-in-education.html

 

  • Blogging Engagement – Challenging others and ourselves to express views/ideas.

Blogs are a tremendous tool for getting students, teachers, and parents involved in educational discussion and inquiry.  They provide a simple straightforward platform that promotes involvement and higher level thinking.  Students that may be shy in the classroom often open up in the blogging environment

  • Blogging Enabling – Creating an opportunity to speak their voice

Blogs allow the author to speak their mind without fear of reprisal. For those who disagree with the opinion and position they can simply stop reading.  The author is granted ownership through the writing of a blog and generally is compelled to produce a post that demonstrates quality work and preparation.

  • Blogging Effectiveness – Comprehending the outcomes why/how to Blog  

Blogs have the ability to be utilized for multiple purposes.  From introductory thinking, to complicated research, a blog has both usefulness and purpose. Blogs can immerse the reader with ideas, interact with an audience, and inspire people to change.

From: http://rliberni.wordpress.com/tag/the-value-of-blogs-in-education/

 

  • Blogs provide a space for sharing opinions and learning in order to grow communities of discourse and knowledge — a space where students and teachers can learn from each other.
  • Blogs help learners to see knowledge as interconnected as opposed to a set of discrete facts.
  • Blogs can give students a totally new perspective on the meaning of voice. As students explore their own learning and thinking and their distinctive voices emerge. Student voices are essential to the conversations we need to have about learning.
  • Blogs foster ownership and choice. They help lead us away from students trying to find what the teacher wants in terms of an answer.
  • The worldwide audience provides recognition for students that can be quite profound. Students feel more compelled to write when they believe many others may read and respond. It gives them motivation to excel. Students need to be taught skills to foster a contributing audience on their blog.
  • The archive feature of blogging records ongoing learning. It facilitates reflection and evaluation. One student told me that he could easily find his thoughts on a matter and he could see how his thinking had changed and why.
  • The opportunity for collective and collaborative learning is enormous. Students have the opportunity to read their classmates’ blogs and those of others. This is not possible in a regular classroom setting.
  • Blogging provides the possibility of connecting with experts on the topic students are writing.
  • The interactive nature of blogging creates enthusiasm for writing and communication.
  • Blogging engages students in conversation and learning.
  • Blogging encourages global conversations about learning–conversations not previously possible in our classrooms.
  • Blogging provides the opportunity for our students to learn to write for life-long learning.
  • Blogging affords us the opportunity to teach responsible public writing. Students can learn about the power of the published word and the responsibilities involved with public writing.

From http://anne.teachesme.com/2007/01/17/rationale-for-educational-blogging/

Venue: CTLI – Kuilsriver

Date: 7 – 10 July 2014

Twitter hashtag:  #TTC2014